Dr. Walden’s Balance of Career and Family

Dr. Jennifer Walden is a pioneer in the cosmetic surgery field for women. Her Instagram shows how she is a woman who has found that mythical balance between work and family. An award-winning, board certified aesthetic plastic surgeon, she owns and operates two MedSpas in Austin, Texas, her hometown, and New York.

Throughout her Instagram, any potential patient can she her devotion to her work and her family. It is saturated with pictures of her 7-year old twin boys and her latest achievements and specials at work. A woman who runs two successful practices and has time to be at her sons’ side for karate matches and other important life events.

For her medical practice, potential patients see advertisements, like her October specials and other moments in surgery. Before and after shots are also on her pages, highlighting such procedures as lip fillers. The pictures come complete with the length of appointment, location procedure performed at, and other necessary information. Her innovative techniques are also showcased on the pages with ear fillers, showing how injectable medications can be used for more than lips and eyes.

Her professional accomplishments are also highlighted. With pictures and details from various speaking engagements, any potential patient can see that Dr. Walden cares about the latest techniques in skin and beauty care. Her patients know that she cares and she even shares Facebook posts from her patients.

Dr. Walden has found that fine balance between work and family, which makes her a better doctor. She is able to care for her patients and make sure they are receiving the most innovative treatments.

Dr. Walden On Instagram

Dr. Eric Forsthoefel Is Worried About Emergecy Rooms In Florida

Dr. Eric Forsthoefel is gravely concerned about non-essential medical visits overburdening the medical system of Florida. According to a study conducted in 2016, at least thirty-percent of Americans choose to use the emergency room when there is no real emergency. With multiple factors considered, there is still no clear reason why this trend is rapidly growing among all social classes in this country. Even reports from the 1990’s reflect similar numbers with an upward trend in growth.

According to the experience of Dr. Eric Forsthoefel, there may be hundreds of non-emergency cases flowing through emergency rooms on any given day. He believes that it is due to many uninsured patients having a lack of access to other means of visiting a doctor. In countries with socialized medicine, there may be options for small clinics available for everyone so that the emergency room isn’t abused.

Let’s consider the high price tag of medical professionals in this country. With more non-urgent cases coming to the emergency room, hospitals need to employ more doctors, nurses, orderlies and other support staff to accommodate the situation. Let’s also not forget the medication, bed space, and equipment used for patients that come in without insurance. The burden is causing emergency teams to become less efficient, which is effectively endangering the lives of patients with real emergencies at hand.

Many medical experts are considering adding financial hurdles to prevent frivolous patients from abusing the kindness of emergency rooms. For example, adding a co-pay to emergency room visits may block many cases straight away. Unfortunately, this may also add the risk of blocking low-income patients from using emergency rooms, even if there is an actual emergency.

The financial aspect is not the only case of why non-essential visits are seen in emergency rooms. Even wealthy people may find that it is much quicker and convenient to go to an emergency room than schedule an appointment with their doctor. The “customer is always right” attitude takes away from the seriousness of using the emergency room.

Young adults are also a higher risk of abusing the facilities of an emergency room. This may be due to a lack of employment, health insurance or their ignorance on how the medical system works. Young people with poor families or a lack of education are even more likely in this case. Men are also a higher risk of using emergency rooms in non-essential cases.

More About Dr. Eric Forsthoefel

Dr. Eric Forsthoefel is an ER doctor with experience working at Tallahassee Memorial Healthcare. With over six years of experience in emergency rooms, he has learned to make tough decisions when it comes to life-threatening emergencies in patients. He also evaluates patients on whether they are ready for discharge or require further attention.

https://www.topnpi.com/fl1013150549/dr-eric-forsthoefel

Dr. Saad Saad Reveals What it Takes to Succeed

Dr. Saad Saad, who recently retired after spending forty years as a pediatric surgeon, gave an interview with Stephen Callahan where he reveals the lessons that helped him succeed in life. The article, titled “Life Lessons from Dr. Saad Saad, Pediatric Surgeon—Update” was published on Blogwebpedia. The article reveals how the pediatric surgeon became incredibly successful and innovative in the tough medical industry.

 

One of the things that motivated him to become a physician was because he recognized the conditions of working were much better than working outside. Dr. Saad grew up in Palestine in the 1940’s during a time of political upheaval. With the creation of the State of Israel, many families were moved to the West Bank. Dr. Saad had a particularly traumatic experience of this move because his father often traveled for work. When his mother took the family on an errand, they were relocated to the West Bank. It took his father a number of hours to search and find his family again.

 

Luckily, his father was a skilled petroleum mechanic. In the 1950’s oil was starting to become a growing industry in the Middle East. His father moved the family to Kuwait to take advantage of the situation. His father often imparted great advice to his family and he told his son that one of the best ways to escape poverty was to pursue a higher education. With knowledge and understanding of the world around him, he could pursue any career he liked. When Dr. Saad was in high school, he had an experience that convinced him of the importance of that advice. He was working on a construction site in the heat of Kuwait’s summer. After spending some time in the sun while working, he suffered a heat stroke and fainted. He recognized that he wasn’t suited to outdoor labor and he realized the only place with consistent air conditioning was an operating room. This led the doctor to become a pediatric surgeon.

 

Dr. Saad also believes procrastination can kill success. He believes in getting more done today so tomorrow is not as difficult. He understood that high levels of success required both effective time management and a strong work ethic. This allowed Dr. Saad to become one of the first U.S. Board Certified Pediatric surgeons. He was also one of the only pediatric surgeons who was fluent in English and Arabic, leading him to become the pediatric surgeon for the Saudi Royal family.

Learn more : https://www.doximity.com/pub/saad-saad-md